To Fish, Everything Old is New Again

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One thing I definitely believe is that a lot of out-of-production lures will catch fish just as well as they ever did. Nowadays too many fishermen are caught up with what’s new rather than what works – and a lot of those old baits still work. When you stop and think about it, old lures that have been out of production might as well be new; most bass haven’t seen anything like them in their lifetimes. Besides, take away the fancy paint jobs on the newer lures, and they’re pretty much the same as the old standards. For instance, I’ve won a couple of local tournaments on Lake Hamilton this spring fishing an old Rebel Wee R made years ago. The original Storm Wiggle Wart, Bayou Boogie, original Cordell Big O and Hot Spot, Hellcat – there are a lot of great lures that you can still find on eBay or in granddad’s old tackle box. The best thing is that when you go fishing down a bank, you don’t have to worry about the guys ahead of you fishing the same baits.

 

Pre-Tournament Report from Beaver Lake with Scott Suggs

 

Choosing the best spinnerbait blade


I live around deep, clear lakes and I love to slow-roll a spinnerbait in deep cover. That’s how I won the Forrest Wood Cup in 2007. A spinnerbait can be used to catch bass at any depth, in any season, though. Most of the time I use a ¾- or 1-ounce spinnerbait for slow-rolling and it’ll have a No. 5 willow leaf and a small Colorado blade with it as a kicker.

The reason I like that combination is because it will stay down in the water column better. If I’m burning a spinnerbait and want it to stay shallow, I’ll lighten up on the weight and go with two willow leaf blades. As for color, to me the best mix is gold willow leaf with a silver Colorado for dingy water, or the opposite for when the water is clear.

In the early spring, I’ll fish a lot of water that varies between dingy and muddy. When it’s really dirty, I’ll use slick copper willow leaf and Colorado blades because, believe it or not, copper puts off more flash in muddy water.

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